The Lost Art Of Resume Thank You Letters.

by Karen Watson on December 17, 2014

Writing resume thank you letters is becoming more of a necessity in today’s ever competitive world. These days, you need to find a way to set yourself apart from the rest of the pack. It can be difficult to do so for a very sought after job. One way to give youself an edge is to simply do the courteous and thoughtful act of mailing a thank you letter after your resume has been looked or even received. Employers want people who are not afraid to take risks and go the extra mil…

Writing resume thank you letters is becoming more of a necessity in today’s ever competitive world. These days, you need to find a way to set yourself apart from the rest of the pack. It can be difficult to do so for a very sought after job. One way to give youself an edge is to simply do the courteous and thoughtful act of mailing a thank you letter after your resume has been looked or even received. Employers want people who are not afraid to take risks and go the extra mile. Sure, sending a resume thank you letter could be a complete waste of time, effort and energy. Then again it could be that one small thing that sets you apart from the other candidates that could be just as qualified, if not more than you.

Resume thank you letters were almost a lost tradition from the days of yester year when courtesy and kindness were a norm. It wasn’t until the hustle and bustle of modern life made everyone so busy and turned everyone into a number that resume thank you letters became popular again. Now, out of necessity, demonstrating that you have additional skills or thought processes has brought the resume thank you letter back and into the forefront for those that like to stay on top.

Writing resume thank you letters are important to both you and your prospective employer. Even as busy as you are, writing the resume thank you letter is the thing you really want to do. In a perfect world where everyone had all the time they needed to get everything done they wanted, sending a resume thank you letter would be one thing everyone would do. Employers notice these small things and appreciate the time and thought that goes into writing a resume thank you letter. Send yours today!

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The Professional Resume and The Interview Trio

by Karen Watson on December 17, 2014

This article was written by Paul Freiberger who runs a resume writing service. This article describes various tactics that you can use to get your prospective employer’s attention.

Professional resumes and job interviews are connected. One leads to the other, if everyone is following best practices.

Professional resume help is an x/y proposition. It is good or it is bad. The prose is well written or clumsy. The style of the resume writer is clear, or opaque. If you’ve chosen an experienced professional resume writing service you should expect high quality work. Anything less may prevent the resume writer from accomplishing the goal you should expect – interviews.

Once you have a solid resume, you will begin to get interviews. If you’re working with an interview coach or any kind of job interview expert, you’ll learn that there are several kinds of job interviews. It’s not a question of good or bad in this case. But you need to understand the details in order to succeed.

Interviews can come in three varieties-behavior-based, conversational, and stress-and it can help you to spot the one you’re in as soon as possible. Of course, they can overlap, or an interview may have segments of one and then another.

Behavior-based interview: Also called competency-based interviews, these feature questions in a pre-ordained order with little opportunity for you to ask questions in return. Usually, the interviewer will let you know in advance that she is using this format. Be sure to provide examples as often as possible when responding here. These interviews focus mainly on eliciting information, and they may test your skill at negotiating clever questions.

Conversational interview: These more resemble the experience of actually working in a firm, and give the employer a greater sense of how you might fit in. They seem relatively free-form and suggest ordinary conversations-but they’re not. They give you and interviewer an opportunity to interact better and establish rapport, but they also let the interviewer circle back and ask the same questions from a different angle, to see if you are consistent or dig up more information on an important topic. Here, as with the first, the interviewer definitely has key questions he or she wants answered. Be careful of the wide-open “bio” question, where the interviewer asks you to describe your life or career. Don’t discourse at length about your early life. Instead, sum it up briefly and move on to the more important recent achievements. Studies suggest that 50 percent of interviews may be of this type.

Stress interview: In this version, the interviewer is curt and asks rapid-fire questions, an approach meant to raise your anxiety and test your ability to handle stress. It isn’t personal, so don’t swallow the bait and respond with annoyance. Instead, relax. You’re seeing through the game.

If you handle your answers well, you’ll be ready to ask your own questions. I’ve always felt that if you remember the interviewer doing a lot of the talking during an interview that the meeting was probably a good one.  No one ever listened himself out of a job, as one former president said.

So if you have a chance, ask good questions of your interviewer. Then sit back and listen. It’s your turn and you’ve earned it. In my next article, I’ll focus on the kinds of questions you should ask during a job interview. This is important stuff. Said Thurber: “It’s better to know some of the questions than all of the answers.” See you next time.

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The Three Elements in a Winning Resume

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How To Create A Resume That Gets Results!

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How to Write a Resume for Your First Job

November 12, 2014

Writing a resume for your first job requires patience, attention to detail, and a little creativity. All job seekers need a strong resume if they want to compete for the best jobs. New professionals, especially, need to work even harder to sell themselves to managers. Writing a resume for your first job requires patience, attention […]

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Resume Writing – Things to Consider

November 5, 2014

You are looking for a job and you are out to land the job of a lifetime. It can happen! Before you consider want ads, job websites, or making inquiries of companies you are interested in, you will need a resume. You are looking for a job and you are out to land the job […]

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Special Cover Letter Considerations For Teachers

November 4, 2014

Cover letters for teachers need to emphasize qualifications as well as attitude. Education professionals need to come into the field with an attitude of service coupled with a commitment to excellence and a desire to work closely with students. It should reflect all of these points, as should resumes for teachers, and any other self […]

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